At the Osteopathic Health Centre Chester we can help you recover from a host of conditions including; low back pain, neck pain, sports injuries, arthritis and muscle spasms.

We are conveniently placed for visitors coming to us from all parts of; Cheshire, Wirral, Deeside, Flintshire, North Wales, Chester, Christleton, Tattenhall, Tarporley, Malpas, Kelsall, Helsby, Frodsham, Hawarden, Great Sutton, Ellesmere Port, Queensferry, Hawarden, Flint, Wrexham.

Human Beings or Human Doings?

 

Many of us lead lives so full that we aren’t always able to enjoy the moment. Sometimes this busyness creates unnecessary tension in our bodies; tense muscles are ones which are more likely to become tired and achy, they are also more easily ‘pulled’ as well as creating pressure on the joints which they control.

 

The ways we use our bodies can be unbalanced; we are predominantly one handed and often stay in one position for too long causing postural tension in the muscles and framework of the body. Even emotional stress can become locked up in our soft tissues creating a time bomb for an everyday movement to result in an injury.

 

 

Tips for De-stressing and Rebalancing


There are thousands of ways to de-stress and find harmony and balance and we all know things which work for us. You could write a list of everything which makes you feel good from singing under a hot shower to walking the dog and see if you can do at least one item off the list every day ( excluding the wine and chocolate maybe! ). Try to really appreciate the pleasure of doing your chosen activity.

 



Here are a couple of extra suggestions of good ways to relax and ground yourself;

 

Three Minute Breathing Space Yes! Can you spare just 3 minutes every day to bring yourself to a point of stillness and balance? Sit on a chair with your feet on the floor and your eyes closed. Perhaps have a watch on your lap so you can keep a vague eye on the time if you wish.


First minute-ish. Allow the thoughts which come into your mind to drift across your awareness trying not to follow them. If you find that your mind does run off, then, as soon as you are aware that’s happening, gently draw yourself back to letting the thoughts drift by like clouds across the sky.


Second minute-ish. Focus on one aspect of your breathing; the coolness of the air going into your nostrils or the sensation of your chest rising. Again, if your attention wanders, then draw yourself back to your breath.


Third minute. Be aware of your body in space; cast your mind’s eye over yourself noticing your position, the parts of your body from the top of your head to your feet on the floor.

 
When you open your eyes try and remember the feeling of grounded-ness that can come from practicing this exercise. The more you practice the ‘3 minute breathing space’, the more easily your mind and body will relax into it.
 
 


Semi Supine

This is based on a wonderful Alexander Technique position which is useful as a daily ‘non’ exercise to get your body back to midline if you have been doing anything which uses your body unevenly. It can be great too if you know you have just done a movement which might potentially have caused you to hurt your back: it seems to prevent the body from going into a reactive muscle spasm. It’s also a fantastic way to relax and get an energy boost!


Find a space on the floor where you can stretch out on your back with your knees bent. Place a paperback or two under the back of your head to prevent your head from lolling back and your chin from tipping up. Have your elbows bent and palms resting on your tummy. As you lie there, imagine your spine lengthening and your shoulders and pelvis widening as your body relaxes. Think your way around your whole body, encouraging it all to ‘soften’ or ‘melt’ so that you can let go of tensions. Include your face and neck, your tummy and your legs. Gradually, as you let go, gravity and the flatness of the floor act together to ‘iron out’ any ‘kinks’ in your spine and body.


If a carpeted floor is too hard for you then soften it further by lying on top of a rug or blanket. If your lower back feels too arched then try placing your feet and lower legs on a chair so that your knees and hips are at right angles.


Stay there for at least five minutes. When you get familiar with this technique you may find yourself wanting to stay in the position for 10 to 20 minutes. As you may have relaxed quite deeply, it’s a good idea to take a couple of deep breaths and gently stretch before you get up.

 
If you can get into the habit of doing this ’non’ exercise at a regular time each day then your body seems to find it easier to relax into the position allowing you to gain the most benefit from it.